How Can We Help You?

Just enter what you are looking for and we will point you in the right direction

NAPTR Records

What are NAPTR Records?

NAPTR records are Naming Authority Pointer records defined by RFC 3403. NAPTR records are used for SIP services as part of a mechanism for specifying transport instructions of SIP requests from source to destination which can be sent over a variety of different protocols including: UDP, TCP, or TLS. SRV Records also play a role in SIP services and some implementations use only SRV records.

NAPTR records provide a mapping from a domain to the SRV record containing the instructions for contacting a SIP server with the specific transport protocol in the NAPTR service field, i.e. NAPTR records provide a mechanism for the called domain to specify which protocols it prefers a SIP request to use.

NAPTR RECORD FIELDS

Field Description

A) Name The host name for which the NAPTR record is defined.

B) TTL The TTL (Time to Live) in seconds is the length of time the record will cache in resolving name servers and web browsers. The longer the TTL, then remote systems will lookup the DNS record less frequently. Your nameservers will also receive less query traffic since most queries are answered by resolving name servers. Conversely, the shorter the TTL the faster any changes you make to your DNS will propagate in servers that have cached data. However, your domain will receive more query traffic.

Recommended values:

Records that are static and don’t change often should have TTL’s set between 1800 (being on the low end) to 86400 seconds (30 minutes to 1 day cache).

Records configured with Failover or that change often should have TTL’s set anywhere from 180 to 600 (3 to 10 minutes cache).

If a change is needed for a record with a high TTL, then the TTL can be lowered prior to making the change and then raised back up again after the changes were made.


C) Order A 16-bit value ranging from 0 to 63535, the lowest number having the highest order. For example, an order of 10 is of more importance (has a higher order value) than an order of 50.

D) Pref Pref(erence) is used only when two NAPTR records with the same name also have the same order and is used to indicate preference (all other things being equal). A 16-bit value ranging from 0 to 63535, the lowest number having the highest order. For example, an order of 10 is of more importance (has a higher order value) than an order of 50. Since NAPTR records carry additional information, applications may ignore the user preference field in order to find a suitable protocol in the “params” field.

E) Flags A Flag is a single character from the set A-Z and 0-9, defined to be application specific, such that each application may define a specific use of the flag or which flags are valid. The flag is enclosed in quotes (“”). Currently defined values are:
U – a terminal condition – the result of the regexp is a valid URI
S – a terminal condition – the replace field contains the FQDN of an SRV record.
A – a terminal condition – the replace field contains the FQDN of an A or AAAA record.
P – a non-terminal condition – the protocol/services part of the params field determines the application specific behavior and subsequent processing is external to the record
“” (empty string) – a non-terminal condition to indicate that regexp is empty and the replace field contains the FQDN of a further NAPTR record.

F) Service Defines the application specific service parameters. The generic format is: protocol+rs. Where “protocol” defines the protocol used by the application and “rs” is the resolution service. There may be 0 or more resolution services each separated by +.

G) Regular Expression A 16-bit value ranging from 0 to 63535, the lowest number having the highest order. For example, an order of 10 is of more importance (has a higher order value) than an order of 50.

H) Replacement Pref(erence) is used only when two NAPTR records with the same name also have the same order and is used to indicate preference (all other things being equal).

I) Notes Add a helpful note with keywords so you can search for your records later.

J) Save Save your record changes and don’t forget to commit your changes after you’re done making record changes for this domain!

NAPTR record

Video Tutorial: How to Add, Edit, and Delete Records

ADD A NAPTR RECORD

1.Select Managed DNS and click on Domains
AXFR1

2. Select the Domain Name you want to add a NAPTR record to.
AXFR2

3. Under the NAPTR Records section, click the plus_icon to add a record.
add naptr 1

4. In this screen, you will add the record information. Follow the steps below:

A) Name: This will be the hostname for your record. It is important to note, the domain name is automatically appended to the “Name” field of the record.
B) TTL: Edit the TTL. Time to Live is measured in seconds and is the amount of time the record will cache in resolving name servers and web browsers.
C) Order: A 16-bit value ranging from 0 to 63535, the lowest number having the highest order. For example, an order of 10 is of more importance (has a higher order value) than an order of 50.
D) Pref: Pref(erence) is used only when two NAPTR records with the same name also have the same order and is used to indicate preference (all other things being equal).

E) Flags: A single character from the set A-Z and 0-9, defined to be application specific, such that each application may define a specific use of the flag or which flags are valid.
F) Service: Defines the application specific service parameters..
G) Regular Expression: A 16-bit value ranging from 0 to 63535, the lowest number having the highest order. For example, an order of 10 is of more importance (has a higher order value) than an order of 50.
H) Replacement: Pref(erence) is used only when two NAPTR records with the same name also have the same order and is used to indicate preference (all other things being equal).
I) Note: Add a helpful note with keywords so you can search for your records later.
J) Save and Close: Save your changes. Don’t forget to commit your changes.

naptr 2

Information on the NX Domain feature can be found in the Disabling a Record tutorial.

EDIT A NAPTR RECORD

1. Select Managed DNS and click on Domains
AXFR1

2. Select the Domain Name you want to edit
AXFR2

3. Under the NAPTR Records section, select a record by clicking the check mark next to it, then click the edit_icon icon to edit a record.
edit naptr 1
Please note, you can not edit a record that has not been committed following its creation.

4. Edit any of the record data you wish to change. Click Save and Close.
edit naptr 2

DELETE A NAPTR RECORD

1. Select Managed DNS and click on Domains
AXFR1

2. Select the Domain Name you want to delete records from.
AXFR2

3. Under the NAPTR Records section select a record by clicking the check mark next to it, click the delete_icon icon to delete a record.
delete naptr 2
Please note, you can not delete a record that has not been committed following its creation.
4. The record will now show as strike through text, and is now in the queue of changes to be committed.
delete naptr 3

5. If this was a mistake, you can click the undo_icon icon to undo the deleted record.
undo delete naptr